Dill

December 3, 2018

Its that time of the year around the world where we begin to celebrate the “silly season”.  We over indulge in festive foods and treats.  Among its many health benefits did you know DILL can relieve an upset stomach, bloating, gas and nausea.

 

Want to know more about the health benefits of DILL? 

  DILL Dill (Anethum graveolens), is a popular culinary herb which has been used medicinally since ancient Egyptian, Greek, and Roman times. It is an annual herb in the celery family Apiaceae, and is the only species in the genus Anethum. This herb often grows up to 40 – 60cm and has slender, hollow stems, and alternate, finely divided, feathery leaves which are similar to those of fennel, except harder in texture. The flowers are commonly white to yellow in colour and the aroma is similar to that of aniseed. Dill originated in the Mediterranean region, specifically southern Russia, and West Africa. The parts of this plant commonly used are the leaves, flowers, and seeds. The leaves should be picked fresh, usually after the plant has reached 8.5cm in height, as the leaves are often difficult to dry successfully. The dried leaves need to be stored in an airtig

January 9, 2016

Scientifically known as Cymbopogan citrates, lemongrass is a herb that is used for its culinary and medicinal uses.       USES:

  • Pesticide/insect repellent
  • Antifungal/antibacterial
  • The oil is used to treat ringworm
  • Used to treat fever by inducing sweating
  • Calm upset stomachs/diarrhoea
  • Alleviates headaches
  • Treats lice, athlete’s foot, and scabies
  • Alleviates cold symptoms
  • Perfumes and soaps
  • Aids with insomnia
  • Powerful antioxidant
  • Aids with stress and anxiety
  • Relieves muscle pains
  • Anti inflammatory
  • Good source of vitamins A and C, folic acid, magnesium, zinc, copper, iron, potassium, phosphorus, calcium, and manganese
  • Some studies say lemongrass has anti-cancer properties
  • Aids with arthritis and gout
  • Used to treat skin problems such as acne

   CAUTION: Undiluted lemongrass oil can cause skin irritation, rashes, and burning sensations. Not recommended for children, pregnant women, and nursing women. People with liver or kidney disease should consult a doctor before using this herb.   REFERENCES: http://www.nutrition-and-you.com/lemongrass.html , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,