Medical Virtual Reality

March 23, 2018

Virtual reality is not just for the use of gaming anymore, it is used in a wide variety of revolutionary medical applications; from helping with people’s’ phobias to teaching the human body to walk again. (uoflphysicians.com) (MIT Technology Review 2018) There is amazing evidence of the benefit of virtual reality, which can also be said to be the same as mind over matter. Technology has found the perfect way to mimic these natural behaviours. Using this kind of exposure therapy is having a huge effect on rehabilitation for many disorders including Addiction-Dementia-Phobias-Trauma (mental & physical) as well as anxiety, Ptsd, Burn victims for pain management, Autism and Meditation.(Tech Republic (2015)) There are also a number of negative effects from the continual uses of virtual reality goggles. These include nausea, dizziness, walking into walls, tripping, over cables etc. (1995) communication in the age of virtual reality.   There is also a sense of leaving your own physical reality which can be harmful to the individual. A condition known as Photosensitive Epilepsy which is triggered when unnatural stimuli is inputted like flashing lights and moving patterns. (guardian helmets)

May 3, 2017

ANXIETY

An anxiety condition is a medical condition characterized by excessive and persistent worrying and fear. Anxiety, as an emotion, plays and important role in helping us get safely through everyday life, and can be a helpful early warning system in a variety of different experiences. People suffering from an anxiety disorder however, are plagued by persistent, intense, and sometimes irrational worries and fears on a daily basis. Anxiety is very common, affecting 1 in 6 people in Australia. It can occur at any time of life and is common in any age group, with women more often affected than men.   There are multiple different types of anxiety disorders. These include:

  • Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD): While most people can feel worried or anxious from time to time, especially when facing stressful situations such as exams or interviews, people suffering from GAD experience these symptoms the majority of the time. These anxious, worried feelings are often intense, persistent, and can interfere with a person’s everyday lives.
  • Social anxiety/phobia: With this disorder, it is common for a person to feel excessively worried or nervous about interacting with other people in social situations, whether they’re strangers or people they know. People suffering from this disorder may fear being criticized, judged, or humiliated by others dur

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