Health Checks all Men Should Have

December 14, 2017

vasi - men's health check Health screening is an important part of disease prevention. There are many screening tests and examinations that healthy men can undertake to help with detection of diseases such as cancer. Your General Practitioner is well placed to carry out some of these tests, refer you to have other tests, or to advise you on some of  the self-checks you can be doing to monitor your health. One of the key roles of your GP is to prevent disease, so they will be only too happy to help you. The recommendations below often refer to screening for the general population – for men with specific risk factors for a particular disease the recommendations may be different. Your GP will be able to advise you if you are in any doubt.

MEN

Health checks men should have
Disease or condition Who should be tested or examined? Test/examination

January 18, 2017

Mango Tango Healing: Packed full of carotenoids, flavonoids and glucosinolates, this infusion has immense cancer prevention potential.  It contains key nutrients in the protection of our body from problems related to oxidative stress, problems which are factors in bladder cancer, breast cancer, colon cancer, ovarian cancer and prostate cancer.   Focus on: Prostate Cancer, Ovarian Cancer, Colon Cancer, Breast Cancer.   While kale forms the superfood base for this risk-reducing infustion.  It’s the combination of mango, fresh lime and coconut that elevates its health-giving goodness.  This tropically flavoured elixir would be quite at home at your favourite resort.   1 cup mango ½ lime – peeled 2 cups kale ¼ cup shredded coconut 1 ½ cups coconut water.   Mango – Vitamin A, and C, Niacin, Dietary Fibre, Copper, Carotenoids Kale – Vitamins A, B, C and E, Dietary Fibre, Iron, Calcium, Beta-Carotene, Lutein, Copper Lime – Vitamin C, Limonene, Flavonoids, Carotenoids, Potassium Coconut – Protein, Manganese, Molybenum, Copper, Selenium, Zinc   Reference: Discover the Healing Power of Nutrient Infusion reference:  http://nutriinfusion.com.au/products/recipe-book/

March 19, 2016

Prostate cancer, also known as carcinoma of the prostate, is the development of cancer in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. Most prostate cancers are slow growing; however, some grow relatively quickly. The cancer cells may spread from the prostate to other parts of the body, particularly the bones and lymph nodes. It may initially cause no symptoms. In later stages it can lead to difficulty urinating, blood in the urine, or pain in the pelvis, back or when urinating. A disease known as benign prostatic hyperplasia may produce similar symptoms. Other late symptoms may include feeling tired due to low levels of red blood cells.   Factors that increase the risk of prostate cancer include: older age, a family history of the disease, and race. About 99% of cases occur in those over the age of 50. Prostate cancer is the most common cancer diagnosed in Australia and the third most common cause of cancer death.   In 2012, 20,065 new cases of prostate cancer were diagnosed in Australia. This represents 30% of all cancers diagnosed in Australian men. The risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer by age of 85 is 1 in 5 men.   In 2013, there were 3,112 deaths caused by prostate cancer, accounting for 13% of all cancer deaths in Australian men.   Having a first degree relative with the disease increases the risk

Posted in News | Tags: , ,
March 11, 2016

Health screening is an important part of disease prevention. There are many screening tests and examinations that healthy men can undertake to help with detection of diseases such as cancer. Your General Practitioner is well placed to carry out some of these tests, refer you to have other tests, or to advise you on some of the self-checks you can be doing to monitor your health. One of the key roles of your GP is to prevent disease, so they will be only too happy to help you. The recommendations below often refer to screening for the general population – for men with specific risk factors for a particular disease the recommendations may be different. Your GP will be able to advise you if you are in any doubt.

January 7, 2016

Corticosteroids are powerful anti-inflammatory drugs that help to suppress the immune system. These drugs are effective in treating many ailments, particularly autoimmune diseases, and have been used effectively for many years. Corticosteroids (cortisol, corticosterone, cortisone, and aldosterone) are produced naturally in the body by the Cortex, which is the outer portion of the adrenal gland, and can be broken down into two categories:

  1. Glucocorticoids: These act to suppress the immune system and lessen inflammation, while also assisting in the breakdown of fats, carbohydrates, and proteins
  2. Mineralocorticoids: These regulate the balance of salt and water in the body

Synthetic corticosteroids mimic the actions of naturally occurring corticosteroids and are often used as a replacement in people with dysfunctional adrenal glands which are unable to produce adequate amounts of the chemicals. Systemic corticosteroids refer to corticosteroids given orally, or via injection, and distributed throughout the body. These do not include corticosteroids used in the eyes, ears, nose, on the skin, or that are inhaled. Examples of synthetic corticosteroids:

  • Betamethasone
  • Budesonide
  • Cortisone
  • Hydrocortisone