Yarrow

May 10, 2017

YARROW

(Achillea millefolium)

Yarrow is often used internally to treat excessive bleeding, indigestion, and diarrhoea amongst other ailments, and externally to help heal minor cuts and scrapes. Yarrow is also used in cosmetics to treat oily skin and as a cleanser. It is a flowering plant in the Asteraceae (aster, daisy, or sunflower) family and is native to temperate regions of Asia, Europe, and North America. Its name is derived from the Greek hero Achilles as he supposedly used it to heal soldier’s wounds during the Trojan War. It is also known as: blood wort, carpenter’s weed, knight’s milfoil, old man’s pepper, nosebleed, and staunch grass.  

HEALTH BENEFITS:

  • Reduces fevers by inducing sweating
  • Has antiseptic and anti-inflammatory properties
  • Aids with diarrhoea, indigestion, flatulence, and dyspepsia by getting the bile and pancreatic juices required for digestion flowing
  • Stimulates circulation
  • Reduces blood pressure
  • Treats colds and the flu
  • Lessens menstrual bleeding
  • Relieves tooth aches
  • Acts as a decongestant to clear up coughs and sinus infections
  • Treats skin conditions such as eczema
  • Alleviates allergies
  • Prevents haemorrhaging and treats varicose veins by toning blood vessels and dilating capi

November 4, 2016

CHAMOMILE

This herb has been used for centuries to calm the nerves and induce sleep. It is from a daisy-like family of plants called Asteraceae, and while there are many different types of chamomile, the most common are German Chamomile (Marticaria recutita), and Roman Chamomile (Chamaemelum nobile). Chamomile is known to be used by the ancient Egyptians, Greeks, and Romans, and was also popular throughout the middle ages.

HEALTH BENEFITS:

  • Calms the nerves
  • Reduces internal inflammation
  • Reduces bloating and flatulence
  • Aids with teething pain
  • Reduces nasal congestion
  • Soothes skin irritations such as eczema, and psoriasis
  • Alleviates menstrual cramps
  • Aids with sleep
  • Reduces fever
  • Treats colds

March 13, 2016

LAVENDER Scientifically known as Lavandula, the name comes from the Latin root name lavare which means ‘to wash’. Lavender is native to the Old World (Africa, Europe, and Asia). Due to its Mediterranean origins, lavender plants prefer hot summers and dry winters. These plants do not do well with humidity. There are four main types of lavender. These are:

  • English lavender (Lavandula angustifolia): Known as true lavender, this is usually the variety used in making potpourri and oils
  • Italian lavender (Lavandula stoechas): Identified by two brightly coloured ‘wings’ at the top of each flower
  • French lavender (Lavandula dentata): Identified by grey green serrated leaves and a flat, furry, spiked purple flower
  • Winged lavender (Lavandula Sidonie): Identified by ferny foliage and forked flowers

  Lavender has long been used for its aromatic and healing properties. In the medieval times it was thought to ward off evil spirits. Medicinally, lavender is used as a relaxant, an antibacterial agent, and as a sensory stimulant. It is also used to treat a range of ailments including: insomnia, anxiety, stress, indigestion, alopecia (hair loss), headaches, nervous disorders, exhaustion, infections, acne and eczema, and joint and muscle pain.   Forms of lavender av