Ginger

April 28, 2017

GINGER

Ginger (Zingiber officinale) is a flowering plant that is popularly used as a spice or medicinal herb. This plant grows about a metre tall, with narrow green leaves and yellow flowers that originated in the tropical rainforest of Southern Asia. This herb no longer grows wild but is commonly found in India. Indian ginger also has the largest amount of genetic variation. Ginger was exported to Europe in the first century AD and was used extensively by the Romans. The rhizome (root cluster) is the main part of the plant that is harvested and used.  

HEALTH BENEFITS:

  • Stimulates the production of saliva, making swallowing easier
  • Alleviates nausea caused by seasickness/ motion sickness, morning sickness, and chemotherapy
  • Powerful antioxidant
  • Boosts the immune system
  • Decreases blood pressure
  • Alleviates arthritis
  • Decreases the risk of cancer and destroys ovarian and colon cancer cells
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Aids digestion
  • Aids with heartburn and acid reflux
  • Eases headaches and sore throats
  • Helps with the cold or flu
  • Aids with asthma, bronchitis, coughs, and other lung/throat disorders
  • Alleviates colic, loss of appetite, heart palpitations, and diarrhoea
  • Reduces menstrual pain
  • May lower cholesterol levels

April 5, 2017

B VITAMINS

B Vitamins are a group of 8 water soluble vitamins that are essential for certain bodily functions, such as metabolism, energy production, and nervous system function.  

  • Vitamin B-2 (riboflavin): Aids with cellular energy production and is important for protein metabolism. It also affects the metabolism of iron in positive ways, and produces important antioxidants which help to prevent free radical cells. It is also needed to change Vitamin B-6 and folate into forms the body can use. Food sources include: almonds, brewer’s yeast, wholegrains, wheat germ, mushrooms, soy beans, wild rice, dairy, eggs, broccoli, spinach, brussel sprouts, beet greens, asparagus, turkey, beef liver, salmon, and lamb. Riboflavin is destroyed by light so foods containing the vitamin should be stored away. It can also be lost in water when foods are boiled or soaked. It is best absorbed when taken in between meals. Riboflavin is considered safe, even at high doses. Possible side effects include: itching, numbness, burning or prickling sensations, bright yellow urine, and sensitivity to light. Taking only certain vitamin B supplements at one time can upset the balance of the other important B vitamins. This vitamin can interact with other medications so it is best to seek medical advice before taking any supplements.

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March 27, 2017

HOUSEHOLD TOXINS AND THE HEALTH BENEFITS OF HOUSEPLANTS

Not only can indoor plants be aesthetically pleasing, they’re also great for your health. There are many benefits of having indoor plants, from clearing toxins and pollutants, to creating a calming environment and an increase in productivity. There are three main types of household toxins. They are: benzene, formaldehyde, and trichloroethylene. These toxins are produced in the production of synthetic materials, and are often produced from these new materials for some time. Some new items of furniture are coated with polybrominated diphenylethers (PBDE’s) which are a class of flame retardant chemicals notorious for emitting toxins into the air for years after manufacture. Other toxins or toxic compounds around the home can include: mould, lead, radon, bisphenol A, Triclosan, carbon monoxide, perfluorinated chemicals, volatile organic compounds (VOC’s), and phthalates. These toxins live in walls, air fresheners, paints, varnishes, fabric softeners, carpets, couch cushions, baby products, household cleaning products, deodorants, candles, vinyl, non-stick pans, Teflon, insulation, and many more seemingly harmless items. Studies suggest that the indoor areas where we spend most of our time may be 2 – 5 times more polluted than outdoors. Exposure to household toxins causes a variety of health concerns, in

February 10, 2016

What is Olive Leaf?

The term “olive leaves” refers to a mixture of leaves and branches from both the pruning of olive trees and the harvesting and cleaning of olives. The production of olive leaves from pruning is 25 kg per olive tree, and 5% of the weight of harvested olives collected at the oil mill can be added to that weight.  Olive tree (Olea europaea L.) leaves have been widely used in traditional remedies in European and Mediterranean countries. They have been used in the human diet as extracts, herbal teas, and powder and contain several potentially bioactive compounds with a range of health benefits.  

Where Does Olive Leaf Come From?

The olive is an important crop in the Mediterranean Basin, which produces 98% of the world total (approximately 11 million tons)  and lends important economic and dietetic benefits to the people of that region. The introduction of olive cultivation coincided with the expansion of the Mediterranean civilizations, and the olive has been used widely in traditional remedies in European Mediterranean islands and countries such as Spain, Italy, France, Greece, Israel, Morocco, Tunisia, and Turkey.

Olive Leaf Benefits

In alternative medicine, olive leaf extract is typically touted for treatment or prevention of the following health problems: Allergies, Alzheimer’s disease, candida yeast, chronic fa