Paracetamol

February 11, 2018

AKA ACETAMINOPHEN Paracetamol, also known as acetaminophen, is a medicine used to treat pain and reduce fever. Paracetamol itself is commonly used for mild to moderate pain relief but is also often used in conjunction with other types of medications such as cold and flu medications, or opioid pain medications for severe pain. It is used to treat many conditions such as headaches, toothaches, sprains, muscle aches, back pain, arthritis, period pain, colds, and fever. It was discovered in 1877 and is the most commonly used medication for both pain and fever in the United States and Europe. Paracetamol is considered one of the safest and mildest forms of pain medications. It is considered one of the safest for pregnant and breastfeeding women and doesn’t interact with many other medications that do not contain paracetamol. It is also the first choice of pain medication for people on the blood thinner, warfarin. It doesn’t interact with food, or low amounts of alcohol (less than 3 standard drinks in a day), and will not make you drowsy or affect cognitive function. However, studies show that an overdose of this medication can be fatal, a

December 19, 2017

      Vasi Centre -things_you_would_know_about_women_and_workouts2 Most tips relating to exercise apply to both sexes but when it comes to getting more out of your workouts, there are certain issues that relate to women. Time your exercise with your menstrual cycle.  A study by the University of Adelaide found that women who exercise at this time of the month when levels of estrogen and progesterone are at their highest, burn more fat for energy, which leads to weight loss and less exercise-related fatigue. Ignore the mirror at the gyms.  One study found that women who exercised in front of a mirror felt less calm and more tired after 30 minutes of exercise than those who exercised without mirrors. You can be both healthy and heavy.  Research shows that the amount of activity you get, not your weight, is the chief predictor of heart disease. Check your iron levels. Women with low iron levels find it harder to maintain an exercise regime than those with normal iron levels

Posted in News, Uncategorized
October 3, 2017

Tonsillitis can be defined as the swelling of the tonsils due to infection.

The tonsils are the two small pads of glandular tissue found at each side of the back of the throat that act as part of the immune system. They work by producing antibodies and white blood cells which then attack the germs found inside the mouth. The tonsils are essentially the body’s first line of defense against airborne bacteria, pathogens, or germs found in food, and act to block these from invading the body once they enter through the mouth or nose. As the tonsils always come into contact with outside particles, they are often inflamed or enlarged, usually without a problem. Tonsillitis occurs when there is an influx of bacteria or other germs and the tonsils can’t handle the workload and become overwhelmed, resulting in them becoming very inflamed and infected themselves.

Causes of Tonsillitis

Tonsillitis can be caused by either bacteria or viruses, some of which commonly include: Streptococcus bacteria, adenoviruses, rhinovirus, respiratory syncytial virus, influenza virus, Epstein-Barr virus, Parainfluenza virus, Enteroviruses, or the Herpes simplex virus. Other bacterial causes of tonsillitis include staphylococcus aureus, Mycoplasma pneumonia, Chlamydia pneumonia, Bordetella pertussis, Fusobacterium sp., and Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Whether viral or bacterial, tonsillitis c